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Sakmongkol ak 47

ariff.sabri@gmail.com

Monday, 3 November 2008

A Malaysian Marcus Licinus Crassus.

In the byzantine and serpentine(sic) world of politics, anything is possible. KJ has become a character ‘ from hero to zero’. From the crowd favourite he is now trailing the other in Pemuda nominations. The latest figures show Muhkrz having 72, KT having 56 and KJ with 52. with around 11 more pemuda meetings, KJ will probably bag a few more leaving the distribution among them basically unchanged.

Supposed this theory is true; that the number of nominations reflect the mount of money received by each pemuda bahagian. Word in the street ( UMNO Street that is) is that each Pemuda Bahagian gets anything between RM50k to RM100k. Suppose its true, what can we infer from the latest developments?

  1. First we would have thought that the person most identified as the Pemuda ATM machine( KJ) would have pulverise all the others right? Since this does not happen, then it would be reasonable to conclude that the identification is not tenable. Would it?
  2. Second, it would support the suspicions that the person having the fastest rate in increase in nominations, is the real culprit and by association, can be identified as the real living ATM. Wis mangan wak?

The first inference would have eliminated KJ as the principal culprit. Reasonable? Most of us find KJ revolting and repulsive because of our image of him. Perhaps some of them are justified and most of them maybe embellishments of our collective envy. But we must also subscribe to a sense of fairplay. In the case of Khairy, the sense of fairplay demands that we look at KJ in an objective manner.

Sakmongkol finds it unconscionable to see KJ being treated once as a hero to now as potential political pariah. Sakmongkol has once written on the reason why Dato Najib sent smses to a leading criminal lawyer, averring to the concept of loyalty to a friend in need. Sakmongkol has also proposed that the principal reason why Dato Fauzi Rahman stuck to Anwar is because of the concept of loyalty. Sakmongkol sees the same principle need to apply in the case of KJ.

Where are the buffoons who once grovel at KJ’s feet? Where are those young punks who perhaps have gotten filthy rich by riding on KJ’s coattails or gravy train? Those who stood phalanx-like when KJ delivered his speech at one Perhimpunan Agung UMNO. ( yes in that year, Sakmongkol delivered a speech on a resolution on economics and was able to see KJ’s operatives behaving like guards belonging to the Nation of Islam. ( the Black Muslim movement in America led by Louis Farrakhan).

We can only conclude that if they have now deserted the HMS KJ, then it s because their motivation has never been loyalty but money and greed. Perhaps KJ’s slogan of esprit de corps( setiakawan) is a cry for help? Perhaps our distinguished Freudians can help out?

The second inference would lead us to the diminutive Javanese, wong jowo. KT.

When KT was the MB of Selangor he had to fend off allegations of corruption here, there and everywhere. The one time dentist is reputed to have become the richest MB around, not including the taikor in the Land of the Hornbill of course. Sakmongkol remembers that he has to rough it out warding off onslaughts from Lutfi Othman the writer and Selangor Pas leaders notably the easily agitated Hassan Ali.

The pace of development in Selangor is superseded perhaps only by the pace by which KT gives out prime lands and contracts to his friends and cronies. In that process, he has become a Malaysian Marcus Licinus Crassus. Who the hell is this man? maybe the following will reveal some parallels. .

Marcus Licinus Crassus, born into a wealthy Roman family around the year 115 B.C., acquired enormous wealth through (in the words of Plutarch) "fire and rapine." One of his most lucrative schemes took advantage of the fact that Rome had no fire department. Crassus filled this void by creating his own brigade--500 men strong--which rushed to burning buildings at the first cry of alarm. Upon arriving at the scene, however, the fire fighters did nothing while their employer bargained over the price of their services with the distressed property owner. If Crassus could not negotiate a satisfactory price, his men simply let the structure burn to the ground. Another of his profitable ventures was a school for slaves; Crassus purchased unskilled bondsmen, had them trained, and then sold them for handsome profits.

The bulk of Crassus's enormous wealth, however, consisted of his vast landholdings, acquired while he was a lieutenant to Lucius Cornelius Sulla during the civil war of 88-82 B.C. Sulla allowed Crassus to buy captured enemy property at bargain prices, but the acquisitive Roman was not satisfied with this and proceeded to seize the estates of magnates not on the proscribed list, often killing the innocent owners. When his greed surpassed every civilized limit, Crassus lost Sulla's support.

Nevertheless, through loans to nearly every Roman senator and lavish entertainments for the populace, Crassus succeeded in acquiring what he wanted most--political power. During the last years of the Roman republic, he formed the First Triumvirate with Julius Caesar and Gnaeus Pompey. Still unsatisfied, he sought military glory in Syria, but he was defeated and killed at the Battle of Carrhae in 53 B.C. According to a deliciously ironic legend, the Syrians cut off his head and filled it with molten gold.

19 comments:

Jed Yoong 3 November 2008 at 09:13  

Kee Kee Kee.
Hassan Ali, formerly of UMNO....
Kee Kee Kee

Jed Yoong 3 November 2008 at 09:13  

I hope Khir Toyo wins.

sakmongkol AK47 aka Mat Tomoi 3 November 2008 at 09:31  

hassan ali has always been anwar ibrahim's leutenant.
one is entitled to one's hopes

Jed Yoong 3 November 2008 at 09:52  
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Omong 3 November 2008 at 11:11  

so we are left with Mukhriz

some would say that Tun Dr M will have an overriding influence over UMNO affairs

to his credit, he did not blindly follow his dad's footsteps in quitting UMNO

Anonymous,  3 November 2008 at 12:18  

Dear sak,

Interesting post. That’s why I can’t start my day without checking your blog. Talking about enriching one’s coffer, I can only sum it up that whoever holds public positions whether government or opposition, he/she never leaves the office a poor person.

Sabrina

peminat kj,  3 November 2008 at 13:08  

Wang tidak boleh menghapuskan kebencian rakyat. Nama KJ dibooo dalam hampir semua mesyuarat perwakilan. Sebab itulah berapa banyak sekalipun KJ tabur wang, dia tak dapat membeli perwakilan. Di bahagian Jerai, Ketua Pemuda adalah orang kuat KJ, hidup dalam payroll KJ, tapi KJ dapat undi tak sampai 20. Mukhriz menang. Cuba fikirkan.

Anonymous,  3 November 2008 at 13:22  

peminat kj,

tgh2 pikir baru i dapat jawapannya. duit yg kj bagi kat ketua pemuda jerai tu tak pernah turun kat ahli pemuda. tu pasal dia org ingat sama kj.

Anonymous,  3 November 2008 at 13:31  

SAK47,

This blog is one of its kind, we www.kulitpisang.com will be posting your articles on our website as we are relatively new but have a still manage to maintain a steady readership. Pls check us out. Or you can email us at kulitpisangeditor33@gmail.com.

Thanks

walla 3 November 2008 at 13:44  

The wave came. The boat sank. Everyone swam ashore to the nearest island. There they were met by an elderly man. They asked him,

'Are you the Prime Minister of this virgin island upon whose shores we now stand?'

'I don't know anything about virgins, but yes I am the Prime Minister if you can call a CEO of a country that,' he replied.

They persisted, 'But we want to talk to your Prime Minister, not a CEO.'

He sighed, and asked, 'What's the difference?'

They answered, 'Well, in our country, a PM, a minister, or even a president of a political party is elected by the people and we want to speak to the representative of the people in order to ask permission to stay here.'

The CEO replied, 'Ah, and how are those personages elected in your country, if i may be so bold as to ask?'

They rolled their eyes and said, 'Of course they pay some money to the people to win their votes.'

The CEO replied, 'I see, and are the people later happy with their performance?'

They replied, 'truth be said, not exactly.'

The CEO then asked, 'Then may i say you have a strange system. Your people get money to elect the people they later dislike intensely. Doesn't that sound like an unfair exchange?'

They thought for a while, 'Hmmmm..you have a point there. But you see, there's no one else who wants to be candidates for election.'

The CEO replied, 'Surely that can't be completely true. Let me ask you if anyone who doesn't have much money get elected?'

They replied, 'Of course there were some but we are not sure whether some other form of money was exchanged or not. It's all quite murky, you know.'

The CEO rubbed his chin for a while, deep in thought. Then his eyes lit up and he said, 'Ah, let us assume that to be elected one must pay for votes since if there are so few candidates to start with, it must mean all nominated candidates will assume they will have equal chance and therefore to be elected, they must tilt the balance. Since one obviously hasn't done anything in the post sought because one has yet to be elected to the post sought, it therefore follows that the only way is to smile a lot and talk a lot, get others to say more nice things, and buy your way to a winning position. Furthermore, it is also assumed that since all candidates are equal, if one can think like this, so too the others. Which means if others do it, so too must one.'

They replied, 'Yes, that must be it. But we are talking about poor candidates short of lorry loads of cash.'

The CEO rubbed his chin again, 'Oh, haven't you heard of promissory notes?'

They replied, 'But these would have to be notarised to take effect and that runs counter to the Statutes of Good Governance in our country'

The CEO replied, 'Unless, of course, you have a justice system where the prosecutor and the defense counsel can be in cahoots to exclude a material witness.'

They thought for a while and then asked, 'Well, whatever it is, do we have your permission to stay awhile until the next ship passes by?'

The CEO replied, 'Of course, my faith dictates i must welcome all travellers to my humble abode with open arms and bottomless hospitality, so you are all most welcome to stay. Just don't pluck too many of the coconuts. Wrong season, you know.'

They replied, 'don't worry about that, we will help you to replant some using those coconut seedlings that we espy has drifted ashore with us.'

The CEO replied, 'thank you for being helpful. Now just out of curiosity, may i ask you a question?'

They replied, 'what is it? go ahead, shoot.'

The CEO replied, 'Ok, it goes like this. In this island, when we face an intractable problem, we always sing a song. It helps to lighten the heart and melodizes the mind. My question to you, should you choose to accept it, what song do you play in yours?'

They replied in chorus, 'Oh, that's easy. We always sing something, anything by a pop group called Creedence Clearwater Revival.'

The eyes of the CEO popped out. 'Oh, they're quite popular here too. You want to know why?'

They replied, in chorus again, 'Yes, yes, yes! Why??'

The CEO looked afar across the ocean and then turned his kindly and sad eyes to them, and said:

'It's because we live and die by a Creed held together by Clear Waters in order to achieve our greatest Revival.'

They thought for a while, and then asked, 'We can understand creed, clear and revival, but why water?'

The CEO answered:

'Because whatever we do, we always make sure everything flows back to ALL our peoples. Like water.'

The end.

Jed Yoong 3 November 2008 at 14:17  

why you delete my comment?
just so kill joy man!
dun want to comment here man.

tarings 3 November 2008 at 17:29  

Unfortunately, them votes at them divisional meetings would count to nought. Most were by show of hands, and by virtue of the waning support for the PM and the general sentiment of them grassroots geeks towards the PM's son in law. You don't want to be seen the minority kinda thang.

It'd be totally a different ballgame come March 2009. A few perwakilans from each divisions and ballot boxes. Money will flow then, not unlike the elixir of life.

But until then, it'll just be a charade. And most will be lulled stupid. Until that morning after in March.

How come he still won one meh?

Anonymous,  3 November 2008 at 22:25  

SAK, DON'T YOU KNOW THAT ACCUSING ANYONE OF BRIBERY WITHOUT GIVIMG ANY SOLID PROOF (REGARDLESS OF YOUR SEEMINGLY SOUND REASONING) IS A PUNISHABLE OFFENCE UNDER ACA ACT?

Anonymous,  4 November 2008 at 01:20  

SAK47 from malaysiaku zuhriaziz.com
Is this the New Khairy Jamaluddin?
November 3rd, 2008
| Tags: 1 comment
The numerous Interviews given by KJ in the last few weeks caught many by surprise. Not the frequency, but the substantive content that appeared to portray a more open KJ, the KJ many students and young professionals expected from him. As a keen observer of his voice on the net (www.rembau.net), to me his comments in his latest entry entitled “Mendebatkan Isu Debat”; illustrates this change in KJ.



I paste the original question by a commentator using the nick Three Kings:

These are the typical Malaysians of today. When people give arguments they can’t just look at the arguments. I give a few comments on my own personal views on a certain issue, in this case the debating amongst ketua pemuda UMNO representatives, and all you dummy’s attack me and other commentors personally.

How typical. Very immature. But, very much expected from a KJ blog.

KJ, I hope you can elaborate on certain issues. Since you want to be a future leader of Malaysia, I believe that these questions are relevant:

1.) ECM Libra merging with Avenue right after you bought stocks in them. Who approved this merger?

2.) Your Mat Cemerlang branding.

3.) Air Asia getting rights to fly to Singapore right after Kalimullah buys stocks in them.

4.) Why the time of the debate should be now as you are low on the polls? And why at your position only and not other more higher up important positions?

5.) How the hell did Razak Baginda get away with the Altantuya murder case.

6.) What is your position on ISA?

7.) You mention bumiputera rights for student scholarships going overseas aren’t at the same ratio level as the population races. I wonder what is the distribution of tax paid by the population races?

8.) Are your views associated with your father-in-laws? How can you branch out from him.

9.) Who/What are the tingkat empat boys? And what are their official positions? How did they get the positions? Are they qualified? Why are they qualified? What have they contributed towards Malaysia when they have been there.

These are just a few questions. Please post this (webmaster) and answer them (KJ) if you have the time. I wouldn’t expect you to answer tonnes of questions from a blog, but what the heck why not?

I attach KJ’s response below (I took the liberty to cut and paste the three comments into one body of answer):

1) ECM Libra was working on several merger options long before I exercised my executive option scheme to buy a stake in the company. This was in line with the Government’s push to consolidate the financial advisory and stockbroking industry by allowing for the creation of universal brokers and, later, investment banks. From what I know, ECM Libra and Avenue Capital Resources Berhad (Avenue) had informal, non-binding discussions before I became a shareholder of the former. I was not part of the formal negotiations which took place later between the two companies prior to the ‘merger’.
As far as approvals are concerned, ultimately any proposal to merge two corporate entities would require the consent of shareholders. The Government, via the Ministry of Finance and Bank Simpanan Nasional, held a 29.5% stake in Avenue. On its own, the Government could not have approved the ‘merger’ since the consent of the other shareholders was also needed. On 18 May, 2006, Avenue held an extraordinary general meeting (EGM) of shareholders to discuss the proposal. The ‘merger’ was approved by 98% of shareholders present and voting at the EGM.
Had the deal been questionable and something that the Government wanted to push through, surely minority shareholders including established international institutional investors, who were shareholders of Avenue, would not have given such an emphatic endorsement of the deal at the EGM.
2) I don’t really know where the Mat Cemerlang branding came from. If I remember correctly, it was something that Datuk Azeez Rahim, head of Putera UMNO, suggested as part of his initiative to engage with a segment of our youth commonly known as Mat Rempit. I supported him in this endeavour because no one tried to reach out to this group of youths. We wanted to find out what their thoughts and aspirations were and how we could work together to ensure the safety of motorists on the road which was being threatened by this group.
I still believe that the Government and political parties should continue to engage with this group but approach them with a two-pronged strategy. One would be the approach of engagement by trying to understand this group better. The other prong would be stern enforcement of laws. They must know that if they break laws, they will be swiftly reprimanded and punished. Without a two-pronged strategy, this segment of our youth population will continue to be problematic for many Malaysians.
3) Although this is not a question that concerns me directly, from what I understand Air Asia has been asking the Government for a Singapore route for a long time. This is in line with preparing our aviation sector for the open skies liberalisation of air routes in ASEAN starting next year. Also from what I have read and been told, Dato’ Seri Kalimullah Hassan is a shareholder of Air Asia X, not Air Asia. These are different airlines. The recipient of the rights to fly to Singapore is Air Asia, not Air Asia X so I think you got your facts slightly muddled here.
4) I would have called for an open debate whatever the outcome of the nomination process. I believe it is important for UMNO leaders to stand the test of scrutiny, not just among UMNO delegates but also by the general public. We must acknowledge that, for now, UMNO leaders will also become Government leaders. Therefore, we not only owe it to the delegates but also to the rakyat to elucidate our views on the pressing challenges that confront our country today. This is in line with UMNO reaching out and being inclusive to non-party members and the general public.
That is also the reason why I believe the open debate should be conducted for all key positions in UMNO, but it is not my place to make such a suggestion for posts which I am not running for.
5) This is a question about the outcome of a court case based on the presiding judge’s wisdom and consideration. Not having read the written judgment in full (I presume it has not been written yet), I will not want to speculate on what the considerations were that led to the acquittal of Encik Abdul Razak Baginda.
6) I do think there is a need for laws that allow for preventive detention like the Internal Security Act (ISA). This is especially so in a world where threats to a nation’s security increasingly come from non-state actors like transnational terrorist organisations and also individuals who subscribe to violent, apocalyptic beliefs. However, I am against the abuse of the ISA for political purposes. I would, therefore, support some amendments to the ISA which would prevent its abuse for political and non-security purposes, and ensure that those detained under this law are able to challenge their incarceration in a court of law.
7) The two have nothing to do with one another (although I know exactly what you are alluding to). My point is simple: scholarships like the JPA bursary should be given to all high-achieving students regardless of ethnic background. However, when increasing the number of scholarships for non-Bumiputera students, the Government should increase the total number of scholarships awarded. Otherwise the number of scholarships given to Bumiputera students would be less than in previous years. I cannot agree with a zero-sum outcome.
Also, just to indulge in your inference briefly. If the Government were to provide benefits and public goods to segments of the population based on how much taxes they pay, then the rich would get the most benefit from Government expenditure since they pay the most taxes in our progressive taxation system. Surely there is something morally questionable about that outcome.
I have my own views which may or may not be the same as those held by the Prime Minister. I represent a different generation and necessarily my views would be influenced by the zeitgeist or the spirit of my generation’s time which is far removed from the social and historical context that shaped the PM’s own views and beliefs.
9) Aides of the Prime Minister commonly knows as “the Fourth Floor” are competent and professional public servants who have been systematically demonized by certain individuals. This group of ministerial aides is made up of special assistants and press secretaries - support staff available to all Ministers. ”The Fourth Floor” commonly refers to the policy unit tasked with preparing speeches and research memos for the PM, and the communications unit which liaises with the media. The former is headed by Datuk Ahmad Zaki Zahid who prior to joining the PM’s Office worked as an aide to the Minister of Youth and Sports and in management consultancy. The communications unit is headed by Datuk Kamal Khalid who came from Bursa Malaysia. They are assisted by other aides who have experience in journalism, management consulting, investment banking and academia.
Finally, let me thank you for asking specific, detailed questions allowing me to exercise my right of reply in order to shed some light on some issues which have affected my credibility and public image.

Anonymous,  4 November 2008 at 01:23  
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
bro_jinggo 4 November 2008 at 01:32  

Is this the New Khairy Jamaluddin?

The numerous Interviews given by KJ in the last few weeks caught many by surprise. Not the frequency, but the substantive content that appeared to portray a more open KJ, the KJ many students and young professionals expected from him. As a keen observer of his voice on the net (www.rembau.net), to me his comments in his latest entry entitled “Mendebatkan Isu Debat”; illustrates this change in KJ.

I paste the original question by a commentator using the nick Three Kings:

These are the typical Malaysians of today. When people give arguments they can’t just look at the arguments. I give a few comments on my own personal views on a certain issue, in this case the debating amongst ketua pemuda UMNO representatives, and all you dummy’s attack me and other commentors personally.

How typical. Very immature. But, very much expected from a KJ blog.

KJ, I hope you can elaborate on certain issues. Since you want to be a future leader of Malaysia, I believe that these questions are relevant:

1.) ECM Libra merging with Avenue right after you bought stocks in them. Who approved this merger?

2.) Your Mat Cemerlang branding.

3.) Air Asia getting rights to fly to Singapore right after Kalimullah buys stocks in them.

4.) Why the time of the debate should be now as you are low on the polls? And why at your position only and not other more higher up important positions?

5.) How the hell did Razak Baginda get away with the Altantuya murder case.

6.) What is your position on ISA?

7.) You mention bumiputera rights for student scholarships going overseas aren’t at the same ratio level as the population races. I wonder what is the distribution of tax paid by the population races?

8.) Are your views associated with your father-in-laws? How can you branch out from him.

9.) Who/What are the tingkat empat boys? And what are their official positions? How did they get the positions? Are they qualified? Why are they qualified? What have they contributed towards Malaysia when they have been there.

These are just a few questions. Please post this (webmaster) and answer them (KJ) if you have the time. I wouldn’t expect you to answer tonnes of questions from a blog, but what the heck why not?

I attach KJ’s response below (I took the liberty to cut and paste the three comments into one body of answer):

1) ECM Libra was working on several merger options long before I exercised my executive option scheme to buy a stake in the company. This was in line with the Government’s push to consolidate the financial advisory and stockbroking industry by allowing for the creation of universal brokers and, later, investment banks. From what I know, ECM Libra and Avenue Capital Resources Berhad (Avenue) had informal, non-binding discussions before I became a shareholder of the former. I was not part of the formal negotiations which took place later between the two companies prior to the ‘merger’.
As far as approvals are concerned, ultimately any proposal to merge two corporate entities would require the consent of shareholders. The Government, via the Ministry of Finance and Bank Simpanan Nasional, held a 29.5% stake in Avenue. On its own, the Government could not have approved the ‘merger’ since the consent of the other shareholders was also needed. On 18 May, 2006, Avenue held an extraordinary general meeting (EGM) of shareholders to discuss the proposal. The ‘merger’ was approved by 98% of shareholders present and voting at the EGM.
Had the deal been questionable and something that the Government wanted to push through, surely minority shareholders including established international institutional investors, who were shareholders of Avenue, would not have given such an emphatic endorsement of the deal at the EGM.
2) I don’t really know where the Mat Cemerlang branding came from. If I remember correctly, it was something that Datuk Azeez Rahim, head of Putera UMNO, suggested as part of his initiative to engage with a segment of our youth commonly known as Mat Rempit. I supported him in this endeavour because no one tried to reach out to this group of youths. We wanted to find out what their thoughts and aspirations were and how we could work together to ensure the safety of motorists on the road which was being threatened by this group.
I still believe that the Government and political parties should continue to engage with this group but approach them with a two-pronged strategy. One would be the approach of engagement by trying to understand this group better. The other prong would be stern enforcement of laws. They must know that if they break laws, they will be swiftly reprimanded and punished. Without a two-pronged strategy, this segment of our youth population will continue to be problematic for many Malaysians.
3) Although this is not a question that concerns me directly, from what I understand Air Asia has been asking the Government for a Singapore route for a long time. This is in line with preparing our aviation sector for the open skies liberalisation of air routes in ASEAN starting next year. Also from what I have read and been told, Dato’ Seri Kalimullah Hassan is a shareholder of Air Asia X, not Air Asia. These are different airlines. The recipient of the rights to fly to Singapore is Air Asia, not Air Asia X so I think you got your facts slightly muddled here.
4) I would have called for an open debate whatever the outcome of the nomination process. I believe it is important for UMNO leaders to stand the test of scrutiny, not just among UMNO delegates but also by the general public. We must acknowledge that, for now, UMNO leaders will also become Government leaders. Therefore, we not only owe it to the delegates but also to the rakyat to elucidate our views on the pressing challenges that confront our country today. This is in line with UMNO reaching out and being inclusive to non-party members and the general public.
That is also the reason why I believe the open debate should be conducted for all key positions in UMNO, but it is not my place to make such a suggestion for posts which I am not running for.
5) This is a question about the outcome of a court case based on the presiding judge’s wisdom and consideration. Not having read the written judgment in full (I presume it has not been written yet), I will not want to speculate on what the considerations were that led to the acquittal of Encik Abdul Razak Baginda.
6) I do think there is a need for laws that allow for preventive detention like the Internal Security Act (ISA). This is especially so in a world where threats to a nation’s security increasingly come from non-state actors like transnational terrorist organisations and also individuals who subscribe to violent, apocalyptic beliefs. However, I am against the abuse of the ISA for political purposes. I would, therefore, support some amendments to the ISA which would prevent its abuse for political and non-security purposes, and ensure that those detained under this law are able to challenge their incarceration in a court of law.
7) The two have nothing to do with one another (although I know exactly what you are alluding to). My point is simple: scholarships like the JPA bursary should be given to all high-achieving students regardless of ethnic background. However, when increasing the number of scholarships for non-Bumiputera students, the Government should increase the total number of scholarships awarded. Otherwise the number of scholarships given to Bumiputera students would be less than in previous years. I cannot agree with a zero-sum outcome.
Also, just to indulge in your inference briefly. If the Government were to provide benefits and public goods to segments of the population based on how much taxes they pay, then the rich would get the most benefit from Government expenditure since they pay the most taxes in our progressive taxation system. Surely there is something morally questionable about that outcome.
I have my own views which may or may not be the same as those held by the Prime Minister. I represent a different generation and necessarily my views would be influenced by the zeitgeist or the spirit of my generation’s time which is far removed from the social and historical context that shaped the PM’s own views and beliefs.
9) Aides of the Prime Minister commonly knows as “the Fourth Floor” are competent and professional public servants who have been systematically demonized by certain individuals. This group of ministerial aides is made up of special assistants and press secretaries - support staff available to all Ministers. ”The Fourth Floor” commonly refers to the policy unit tasked with preparing speeches and research memos for the PM, and the communications unit which liaises with the media. The former is headed by Datuk Ahmad Zaki Zahid who prior to joining the PM’s Office worked as an aide to the Minister of Youth and Sports and in management consultancy. The communications unit is headed by Datuk Kamal Khalid who came from Bursa Malaysia. They are assisted by other aides who have experience in journalism, management consulting, investment banking and academia.
Finally, let me thank you for asking specific, detailed questions allowing me to exercise my right of reply in order to shed some light on some issues which have affected my credibility and public image.
- End -


What do you think?

Omong 4 November 2008 at 05:07  

1) would not have given such an emphatic endorsement of the deal at the EGM - an eloquent govt personality must have convinced them

2)I supported him in this endeavour because no one tried to reach out to this group of youths - still at support and theory stage or REAL action had been implemented??

3)asking the Government for a Singapore route for a long time - and getting it is not a NATURAL sequence

4)I would have called for an open debate whatever the outcome of the nomination process - without consulting the present Ketua Pemuda? what does this say abt KJ

5)I will not want to speculate - but you could put in your 2cents worth like AI passport?

6)able to challenge their incarceration in a court of law - in effect this is not supporting ISA, confused?

7)high-achieving students regardless of ethnic background; given to Bumiputera students would be less than in previous years - contradiction or confusion??

8)may or may not be the same - safe answer

8)far removed from the social and historical context that shaped the PM’s own views and beliefs - as in a squid vs a shark

9)competent and professional public servants - perhaps there is another "setiakawan" hidden criteria?

to bro_jinggo, we think his reply is SMOKING good but it has not improved his credibility and public image

p.s.
it's time for you to be your OWN man and do your own thinking, some guys are good in theory but lousy in practical

sakmongkol AK47 aka Mat Tomoi 4 November 2008 at 08:10  

anonymous @22.25/3rd nov.
When KT was the MB of Selangor he had to fend off allegations of corruption here, there and everywhere. The one time dentist is reputed to have become the richest MB around, not including the taikor in the Land of the Hornbill of course. Sakmongkol remembers that he has to rough it out warding off onslaughts from Lutfi Othman the writer and Selangor Pas leaders notably the easily agitated Hassan Ali.

sakmongkol said allegations and merely citing what transpired in the past. as to the speed of giving and approving land parcels, these are matters of public record. as to the inference from these, its tepuk dada tanya selera.
in any case, mere mention of KToyo, evokes outburst of righteous indignation- but when the same is mentioned about KJ, they are accepted as unquestionable truth. where got fair man?

Jed Yoong 4 November 2008 at 19:56  

Haiyah, if want to pick on Khir why not pick on all the MBs-lah. Not so different-lah. And then Najib's tenure as Pahang MB..Is it true the state was nearly bankrupted by hiM?? But he is aritocracy so above criticism from mere mortals....

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