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Sakmongkol ak 47

ariff.sabri@gmail.com

Monday, 4 May 2009

On Government, Policies and Free Men

I wanted to write something on policies to clear the Labour market. I am afraid, that will have to wait. One of the demands by the picketing unemployed was for jobs to be created. My question is who create jobs? Not the government. Government jobs are few and far in between.

Private sector creates jobs. How many they do, depends on the economy. The economy and the desired responses of the private sector depend on government policies- affecting the two. If the government blunders, then the signals to businessmen aren't that promising, they don't invest and they don't create jobs. Let us term the set of signals sent- policies.

So, what I wanted to do initially slowly evolve into an inquiry into the efficacy of government policies, in general. We are familiar with the observation- garbage in, garbage out. It is plausible, that what we are experiencing now is the result of flawed government policies.

We have problems in the labour market now. There are not enough jobs and that is closely linked to the state of the economy as a whole. We have people being retrenched and cannot find jobs because of mismatch between skills and wage- paying jobs. And I am not even sure, whether our policy makers take note of the trade-off between unemployment and income disparities? Lower unemployment actually results in widening income disparities? All these may be traced to flawed government policies ranging from misplaced educational policies and so forth.

As a further example, consider the NEP- a specific set of policies aimed at correcting economic injustices. It managed to achieve limited success. For some that is sufficient to crow about and offered as reason, we need more.

I hear the claim that is repeated often- see?, even with the limited success, look at how it has improved the lot of the Malays? That would be a proof, that we need that kind of policy to ensure continued success. And the even more open challenge retort- if we don't have kind-of NEP policy, with what shall we replace it? God knows we need one. We always need protection. That has been in our blood. For generations.

Except that when we measure that 'limited success' against the better successes of the social group by which we measured ours in the first place, then, the inevitable question emerges. How is it possible for one group with limited or no protection been able to pull ahead while the group agitating for correction with unlimited assistance can only managed limited success but still far from target?

Is it the government who is at fault or is there something wrong within us?

Let's get back to the issue of policies and its desired effects. The idea looks simple. There is a symbiotic relation between the government and private sector. Let us construct a model of an economy. Assume there are two parties- the government and non government.

Government and Non Government are united by a common purpose- that of creating the greatest good for society. Government makes policies, create the prospering and enabling environment, upholds the law, protects it citizens. Non government in response produce goods and services, consume them, pay taxes, and obey laws.

By now, it's already accepted, it makes sense for both parties to work together for the common good. The common good is the overriding principle. This point needs to be driven home, because in the course of achieving the common good, there may be disagreements which in the end must be subservient to the overriding principle.

Now, if both are desirous in achieving the best common good, it would be in the best interests of both parties to work on the correct set of inducements. The government because it has a monopoly over coercive instruments of power and monopoly over laws that ensure correct social behaviour are anxious to send the correct signals to elicit desired responses from non government. The non government sector has a monopoly over non-compliance; i.e. it can refuse outright to accept the signals and therefore with it, to withhold the desired response.

To make things simpler we assume the following. The government has an absolute monopoly over policies (an embodiment of all type of powers) while Non-Government has absolute monopoly over appropriate behaviour. Non government wants right policies while Government wants right behaviour.

Hence, it boils down to the issue of the right way to send signals of inducement to get as reward, the right social behaviour.


 

From generalisations, we move on to specifics.

Since 1970, we have implemented the NEP to restructure the economy. We desire to give Malays a greater share in the economy- owning at least 30% of the wealth in this country. We take equity in companies as signifying the extent of wealth holding. It's not entirely satisfactory, but it is close enough.

What have been the results so far? The Malay equity in this country's wealth is probably only near the 20% mark- short of the 30% target set out by the NEP. Failure to achieve this puts down the government. Some attributed the failure to faulty implementation. That attribution is not wrong but not entirely correct either.

It would be wrong however, if one reads from the blame assigned to the government, a suggestion that the entire responsibility lies with the government. Bur surely, the government MUST be wrong, you protest.

We don't like big intrusive government yet we are too quick to assign absolute blame onto them, if something goes wrong. It would then make for a stronger case to install a benevolent despot of a government. The government can say, give us absolute power. Trust in us and we will carry out the objectives.

That proposal is problematical. It would then run counter to the ideals of free men and ideas about democracy. When things do not materialise as we wish them to be, it is easy to place fault on the government. Doing that means you are acknowledging the omniscience of the government. That would further imply that government is the patron, the citizen its charges. That would be a very monumental underestimation of the people's resolve and intelligence to shape their own destiny.

It is we who compose this country; we create a government that facilitates our numerous social transactions. We have not created something that is over us. That being the case, my argument is: faulting the government entirely is not entirely right not because they do not deserve our censure and anger, but because to do so, would underestimate our own free will.

It follows then; the failure of the objectives of the NEP may also be attributed to the failure by the Malays to reciprocate with the right responses. Perhaps we too should be sharing the blame for the failure, by looking at our cultural practices and so forth.

Since the government, the implementers and the intended recipients are Malays, there are probably more reasons in their cultural make up, that can better explain the limited success of the NEP.

42 comments:

Anonymous,  4 May 2009 at 11:38  

http://mplipis.blogspot.com/

Anonymous,  4 May 2009 at 12:10  

Actually if one is to look at the benefits of NEP from a Malay's perpective... hey we did make a lot of headway.

If one is to look at it from the non Malay who say are the businessmen or ones which creates wealth ... they would say .. hey we could have done better.


Before NEP the entire nation, irrespective whether they are Malays, Chinese or any race have to fight for themselves , put more efforts into creating wealth and the country uses its full potentials and grew.

Now with the NEP... just having those rights , 100% here and 30% there , discounts here and and there and hence gets the benefits with little efforts. They gained... but gained from where? Whose wealth was it that gave them such gains and as SAK said limited NEP success.

Wealth does not come from nowhere. When wealth is gained by one party another party loses. .. and this party loses far far more than the little gain by the other party.

The end results is the country as a whole drops in creating wealth and is exactly what has happened to this country.

Before NEP we were equals or better than many countries. After decades of NEP , we are far far behind in almost everything.

I would not indulge into the finer details why NEP is one of the biggest disaster and how it has brought our country to what we are today. Sadly this is a real mega problem our country will find very difficult to come out of it.

Remember, the gains of one party as a result of NEP creates a loss by the other party contributing to this loss is many times more.

Wealth does not come from nowhere ... it has to come from somewhere and someone who works for it. IF this party can gain much more in other countries, do you think he/she wants to invest in this country ?

You are creating an entire community who takes it easy.. because they thing it is easy to get wealth just because they belong to the correct race.

Go figure.

Anonymous,  4 May 2009 at 12:42  

"Since the government, the implementers and the intended recipients are Malays, there are probably more reasons in their cultural make up, that can better explain the limited success of the NEP". There's considerable truth in that statement of yours.

Many Malays take the easy way out. Tengku A. Rahman gave away Singapore rather than send troops like Tun Hussin Onn did to Kelantan later on. Malays are over generous; Tun Tan Siew Sin said before May 13, 1969 that we were "generous enough" not only in agreeing to citizenship for non-Malays but also relaxing the citizenship rules after Merdeka. Yet we don't do anything about those who don't even acknowledge the Social Contract. We asked for only 30% of corporate wealth, no mention of other forms of wealth, and now some Malays talk about relaxing the NEP.

But most of all, Malays are easily corruptible. We have to accept this fact. The Chinese have also been corrupt for thousands of years since the system of eunuchs and Empress Dowagers in China. But 4,500 years of endless struggle through wars, clan fightings, natural disasters and cruel rulers have made them a hardy lot. We Malays join politics, jostle to become delegates, benefit from money politics, get negotiated contracts, ali baba them and enjoy life.

We must look hard into the mirror and pull up our socks. Keep the NEP, change the method of implementation, spread out the benefits, particularly to those who are genuinely doing businesses and not to those who are in the habit of taking commissions.

Ree,  4 May 2009 at 13:58  

Dato Sak,

I did not bother to comment in your blog during the "photo" saga. I think it was just mountain out of a molehill.

This current article is more interesting for me to comment on. I have to disagree when you say that equity in companies as per NEP is "close enough" to reflect "wealth of this country". I have argued in your blog before that the 30% NEP objective is completely worthless as it is based on nominal shares of all the companies in Malaysia, aggregated. A person with 30% may actually be richer than a person with 70%. It all depends on which companies he own.

The more precise way to measure the wealth of a country is to aggregate the market value (or approximate market value) of all tangible assets in the country.

It would an interesting study to measure national wealth this way and then look at who actually owns what. It would be even more interesting if the study can compare different time periods, say right after mederka, at the start of NEP and now.

I suspect a very large chunk of wealth in this country is actually owned by the government (federal, states and govt linked agencies/companies). Just think about the giants in the economy like Petronas, EPF, Khazanah, Felda, PNB, State SEDCs etc how much assets do they own in aggregate?

Fi-sha 4 May 2009 at 14:11  

Dear Sir,

Interesting post. As a product of NEP, let me tell you how distorted our policies and job creation prospects are - i wanted to be a psychiatrist, did a degree in Biochemistry and now i'm in banking? I am not complaining (nor am i suggesting how good i am) but in today's challenging times, i wonder if by-products of our education system could be jack-of-all-trades.

Wenger J Khairy 4 May 2009 at 17:06  

Well, is NEP wealth transfer or wealth creation?

Thats a big difference between those 2 terms. If its wealth transfer, one loses, and the other gains, but of course here is people do not get it, the country as a whole loses due to "deadweight" losses or economic inefficiencies.

If its wealth creation, thats a different story, But are we doing it? How does one create wealth from the NEP - well put into more productive use the factors of production of course - labour, land and capital. But do we do that?

Anonymous,  4 May 2009 at 17:38  

Wenger,

What wealth creation?

It has always been wealth transfer, right from the beginning.

Everything associated with NEP is a zero sum game. One gains on the expense of the others.

The cruelest part is that the transfer is done via minimum input for maximum output. AND also because of that, NEP attracts all the rent-seekers.

In a nutshell, NEP in its form has a built-in self mismanagement tendency, thus the wide-spread exploitations in the name of implementation.

Hard-T 4 May 2009 at 18:32  

The NEP was planned to correct the imbalances in a multi-racial society. As a result, we are better off than when we started, even though we may not have fully achieved what we set out to do. NEP has shown tangible results in the economic sphere but the lack of open discussion is preventing Malays from making a clear assessment of its psychological impact on them.
Datuk Sak,
This article can benefits Malays, but can you explain how the Malay psyche had been affected by the NEP.

And, another one is what I know is NEP was aimed not only at raising the economic status of the Bumiputeras but also that of the other races in the country. Only the opposition kept on harping that the policy only benefited the Bumiputeras.
Tq

Omong 4 May 2009 at 18:45  

so many anons giving expert advice

can we trust these anons??

they should be unmasked

at least leave a nic

sakmongkol AK47 4 May 2009 at 19:14  

omong,

anons are regarded as inconsequential kan? that seems to be the consensus. if those anons that destroy others are regarded as trivial, these that contribute useful inputs are more than trivial. should not be cause for worry

Anonymous,  4 May 2009 at 20:33  

I think the issue is not the Anons. Those who leave nics also don't identify themselves. Only a very few really do.

For so long as they say things sensible, are not rude and are not ill-motivated, they should be allowed to have their say. Except that they tend to spawn a few irresponsible ones.

The fellow who signs off as "Go figure" sounds familiar. His statements at 12:10 and those of Anon at 17:38 must not be allowed to go unchallenged. These people are either not aware or want to twist the premise of the NEP: that it is the allocating of a slice of the enlarged cake, the widening economy. It is not a matter of taking anything what Ah Kow already owns and giving it to Ahmad.

All those negotiated contracts, turn-key projects, toll highways and so on were not owned by Ah Kow. The Government created new projects, enlarging the economic cake, and gave some to Bumiputeras. Now don't tell me the non-Bumis didn't get anything. Go ask (don't just "go figure") Vincent Tan, the Queck family, Ananda Krishnan and many others.

It's irresponsible and dangerous to talk about "wealth transfer", suggesting that the Malays are taking from the non-Malays. Those share allocations by Rafidah etc were also of companies that asked for public listing - again, it's from the enlarged capital, tapping capital from the public through the Stock Exchange. Who says those shares meant for listing belong to Ah Kow? Their shares in the original companies invariably remained intact. It's the additional shares that they asked to allow the public to subscribe that were allocated - and only a portion, not all - to Bumis. And remember, Ah Kow also gets the new shares. AND Ah Kow benefitted tremendously from such exercises - the Government gave the approval and they double, even treble their existing pre-listing shares, PLUS the new shares allowed, upon public listing. And the Malays paid for those shares, not getting them free.

Anonymity has encouraged this kind of irresponsible statements. But until there is a law against it, they'll continue to surface. And they must be challenged, their mischievous arguments debunked, otherwise the lies and half truths may appear factual. They may even cause ill feelings among the various communities in the country.

sakmongkol AK47 4 May 2009 at 22:04  

anon 20:33
For so long as they say things sensible, are not rude and are not ill-motivated, they should be allowed to have their say

i hv no problem at all with yr statement. i shall published even arguments that debunk my own provided they are stated in gentlemanly and civil manner.
we are old enough to disagree without getting into fisticuffs.
thanks/best regards

Anonymous,  4 May 2009 at 23:09  

If one is to ask >most Bumis will say that they have not really benefited from the NEP.Likewise,most non Bumis thinks all Bumis are where they are cos of the NEP i.e. without the NEP Bumis will still be toiling in the villages.

What we all need is a litmus test of whether the NEP have enhanced or robbed any individual of their rights.

Anonymous,  5 May 2009 at 08:11  

"What we all need is a litmus test of whether the NEP have enhanced or robbed any individual of their rights'. What is this Anon 23:09 talking about?

He must be one of those who I've seen try to point out the Clause in the Constitution that says every citizen has equal right under the law, but refuse to acknowledge Clause 153 giving the Malays a special position under the very same Constitution which is the highest law of the land.

This group also does not acknowledge the existence of the Social Contract by which, prior to Merdeka, the Malays agreed to the non-Malays getting citizenship
in exchange for getting the special position written in the Constitution.

Come on, man. Learn to give and take. You can't get everything in this world. You go to Fiji where the immigrants have outnumbered the locals and they still don't get all that they want. Be reasonable lah, don't begrudge the Malays with their special position as they don't begrudge you getting the citizenship. Let's live peacefully in this country.

sakmongkol AK47 5 May 2009 at 08:43  

ree,
you said:-
A person with 30% may actually be richer than a person with 70%. It all depends on which companies he own.

this one i am not sure. if you say, a person with 30% may be richer, then it is also logical to accept that someone who owns 50% of the same thing, is richer still.

you also said:


The more precise way to measure the wealth of a country is to aggregate the market value (or approximate market value) of all tangible assets in the country.

i find myself in total agreement with you. i have often wondered, if all the tangible assets in this country is accounted for, we will know the extent of riches. who owns lands,buildings, capital equipment, etc.

Anonymous,  5 May 2009 at 09:07  

Anon 20:33

A typical case of pot calling kettle BLACK!

Yr style of writing show yr identity! Does double-face work for u? Use nic (isn't this another form of anon, except its registered?) when u write to show superficial righteousness, then turn to anon when u put forward yr tin-kosong argument!

I used anon because (1)I dont believe showing my true identity under the current circumstances, not that I write seditious comments,(2)I'm not a daily cyber-surfer, who live-&-breadth blog taggings, thus ignoring daily personal responsibilities, (3)I keep quiet when I have nothing relevant to contribute, there r too many cyber-fame seekers as of now.

'These people are either not aware or want to twist the premise of the NEP: that it is the allocating of a slice of the enlarged cake, the widening economy. It is not a matter of taking anything what Ah Kow already owns and giving it to Ahmad.'

Do prove yr cases. AND pls dont dispute those 'obvious' cases of wealth transfer with the oft-used 'wrong implementation by little Napoleons' excuses.

'Those share allocations by Rafidah etc were also of companies that asked for public listing - again, it's from the enlarged capital, tapping capital from the public through the Stock Exchange. Who says those shares meant for listing belong to Ah Kow?'

U sure u know what u r writing?

Those shares meant for listing DO belong to Ah Kow. It is created out form their commercial efforts. U want those shares? Pay for them at market value just like all the other share applicants! Why ask for preferential allocations at preferential price? Some more have a second bite, too. R u 'one up' than those others?

Ouch, 30% free falls for 60% is fair deal!

'..it is the allocating of a slice of the enlarged cake, the widening economy.'

Expanded share base (ie more share numbers) does not contribute enlarge economic cake, if there is NO REAL physical wealth creation. IPO does not in itself means widening economy. Its only a form of funding exercise - someone still needs to work, plan, managed & market the company's product to create real wealth!

Is that why all those paper wealth exercises so favoured fell like ten pins just after a economic crisis? Where's Renong now? Or better still, where's the 'empire holdings' of Fleet Group now?

Now tell me where u r NOW?

For parting shot - this is for u to think about;

'Anonymity has encouraged this kind of irresponsible statements. But until there is a law against it, they'll continue to surface. And they must be challenged, their mischievous arguments debunked, otherwise the lies and half truths may appear factual. They may even cause ill feelings among the various communities in the country.'

So far the only reasonable phrase out of the written craps!

Anonymous,  5 May 2009 at 09:21  

The more precise way to measure the wealth of a country is to aggregate the market value (or approximate market value) of all tangible assets in the country.

1>What about Casino,gaming,gambling license?How do you put a value to that?
2>Sole Distributorships of consumer/retail products?This includes CocaCola right down to Nokia Phones.
3>Import License of flour,sugar,corn?

just a thot on valuations...

Ree,  5 May 2009 at 09:52  

Hi Dato Sak, you said

This one i am not sure. if you say, a person with 30% may be richer, then it is also logical to accept that someone who owns 50% of the same thing, is richer still.

My response:

No. Because it is not "of the same thing"! The 30% or 50% you are referring to represent a portion of the nominal equity of many different companies in the economy, which are aggregated by the NEP. However, each company will have different market value for its equity. Some equity have high value and some are worthless. If I hold 30% of the aggregated equity which are the high valued ones, adding 20% of worthless equity will not make me any richer.

sakmongkol AK47 5 May 2009 at 09:56  

this is a personal forum of open debate. as long as opinions are not expressed in expletives and foul language,i assure commentators, their comments are not edited or shortened even if they disagree with me.
i have been forced to use this moderating tool because i have low tolerance of being vulgarised at.
thank you very much

Ree,  5 May 2009 at 10:17  

Dato Sak,

You mention culture and I would like to comment on that. There is one aspect of Malay culture that I really think make the Malays worse off financially. It is in relation to the conduct of weddings.

There are too many ceremonies when it comes to Malay weddings, each with its own kenduris. The Hantarans are also over the top. Lots of money are spent just to tie the knot. As a result, many young Malay couples start off their family life in debt or with 0 savings. This is not a good start considering the high cost of living and low income nowadays. They can only start to accumulate assets late in life.

This is different to the Chinese who tend break even or close to break even (or sometimes even make a profit!) at weddings.

Anonymous,  5 May 2009 at 12:40  

We argue on 30% or 50% ownership. Of the same thing or not the same thing. Aggregate or approximate market value. Corporate and other forms of wealth. All tangible and not so tangible assets of the nation. Hopefully we will agree on the basis of calculation. Not like on one occasion before where they put GLC assets under Bumi-owned.

I do not know if the authorities have tallied all the tangible assets of the nation and worked out the % ownership. I think suggestions have been made in the past. It is time we know the extent of ownership of the assets and the control of the economy by those who have been at it since Independence. It may help those who do not agree on the NEP 30% corporate wealth target to understand and agree. I wonder if the % will be so low as to bring about a clamour for more.

In the first place, can it be done? If so, has it been done? If not, why not. I hope some one qualified in Economics and/or Accountancy will throw some light. I will be grateful for that.

Bad Spellers of the World Untie! 5 May 2009 at 13:17  

I'm a newbie to the whole blogsphere-leave-your-comments-change-peoples-lives thing, but just like everyone else here, I have an opinion I would like to share. Relevant or not, at least I'm not anonymous.

I feel that we Malays are in this pickle because of a boo-boo made by the Ministry of Education many moons ago. Allowing entire racial demographics to receive an completely different enducation in a foreign language can't have been the wisest thing to do. I mean, in what other country in the world are migrants allowed to set up their own school system completely separate from the national schools? I suppose here is another example of Malaysia Boleh.

It might just be me, but when in business, one would always prefer to have dealings with old boys rather than lesser beings from some other school. If all of ones old boys are Ah Kow or wong, poor old Ahmad and Muthu won't even get a look in.

Mind you, it can be said that there is nothing stopping Ahmad from only doing business with Abdul or Ali, but that will simply widen the already huge racial divide that exists in this country and push us even further away from 1Malaysia.

Kalau ingin melentur buluh biarlah dari rebungnya or something to that effect leaps to mind. Every 7 to 17 year old in Malaysia should go through the same Malaysian School Experience and be taught the history of Malaysia, not China. Whether or not they are taught in English or Malay is something else entirely, my point for this post is that our next generation, Chinese, Malay, Indian or Dan Lain-Lain have a better chance of forming a more unfied citizenry if they are taught to be colour blind as far as race is concerned. Easier said than done, I know, but a start would be to do away with Chinese & Indian schools.

Anonymous,  5 May 2009 at 16:32  

Bad Spellers of the World Untie!

I'm not sure whether you meant Unite. But I agree with your view about the education system.

Btw, the people at Demi Negara Blogspot are preparing a Memo to be sent to the TPM/ Menteri Pelajaran on the very subject you mentioned. They are doing a roll call on those who want to be counted and have their names or pseudonyms included in the Memo. You might like to visit that blog and state a one-line suppport now.

Anonymous,  5 May 2009 at 16:51  

Bad Spellers of the World Untie,

Don't really know what you are trying to say with your nickname. You are just as anonymous as the next anon.

Do you know that even in the little red dot, you can choose to send your children to a madrasah for an education if you so desire ? The next question is why do people send their children to vernacular schools ? Is it better than the national schools ? Why do our ministers including the last Education Minister and the current PM send their children to International schools instead of to our local schools ?
The answers to the above questions are what you would be seeking.

Bad Spellers of the World Untie! 5 May 2009 at 19:22  

Dear Anonymous, I'm not trying to say anything with my nom de plume, if you think its funny, laugh, if not, move on with your life.

What I'm trying to say in the post is that we might not need an NEP if everyone in Malaysia saw them selves as Malaysian first and Malay, Chinese, Indian and Dan Lain Lain second. Thats all.

As for madrasahs, well, we shouldn't have them either.

If you want to know why our Ministers sent their children to International Schools, it would be best to ask them.

Personally, I speak as a product of our very own Malaysian Education system, when I say it is far from perfect, greatly flawed and in need much improvement, but it is still the best opportunity for young Malaysians to develop a sense of national pride and identity which is currently missing.

Dear other Anonymous, thank you for pointing me in the direction of Demi Negara Blogspot, I shall endeavour to learn more.

Are You Gonna Go My Way,  5 May 2009 at 20:25  

The NEP is here for many reasons; social, political and economics. Most of us tend to concentrate on the economics side, maybe to touch on the social and political part would be too sensitive to many people.

There will not be an NEP debate if:

1. If there is only one race in Malaysia, we won’t see the existence of this debate simply because whoever makes money does not matter at all because we are all one and the same.

2. If our forefathers didn’t sell their soul and soil to the Portuguese, Dutch and English and other foreigners. The sins and mistakes of our fathers, we’re now trying to clean and rectify. One way of cleaning it is by NEP.

3. If we didn’t allow the Chinese and Indian immigrant to become Malaysian citizens.

4. If the Chinese could have been a bit fair in their dealings with the Bumiputras, no double standard in pricing of goods supplied to Malays and Chinese shop owners. Or the term now known as level playing field.

5. If the British didn’t divide and rule. Example, the law that did not allow the Malays to become traders in rubber but only can become tappers. Only the Chinese were allowed to become buyers and sellers of rubber.

6. If the British didn’t take away money from Tanah Melayu that belongs to early Malay businessmen that also happened to be the Malay royalty (eg. Raja Abdullah who founded the tin mine business)

7. If only the Malays have money or capital to start their own business.

8. If only money given to send bumi students overseas, will also be given when they return home to start their own business. The government willing to spend hundreds of thousand for a single student to study but not willing to lend RM25k to allow then to start a business back home.

9. If only the rich Malays can spend back the money or reinvest to other Malay upcoming businessmen instead of keeping it quietly or spend it overseas.

10. If only the Chinese realize that even with NEP, they still make more money than the Malays. In a contract to build a school in value of 3Million, 30% goes to the Malay contractors 70% goes to the Chinese suppliers.



11. If only the Chinese ADA HATI BUDI SIKIT DAN TAK KISAH SANGAT SEBAB ORANG2 CHINA TAK MAKIN MISKIN PUN…TAKAN ITU PUN NAK BERKIRA

Anonymous,  5 May 2009 at 21:34  

As I sit here in the confines of this plush genuine leather sofa,sipping a premium drink of no real consequence..I wonder whats the fuss about this NEP?

I am amazed that after so many years I still can't get my Bentley serviced by a Malay owned service centre...and its the same with my ferrari,lamborghinis,rolls..I genuinely want to give business to my own people but they are just not ready.Why can't they have the business skills and dedication that I have?

I started as a contractor...those were the days..its easier then because for every contract you get 10%..thus all I need is to take off two zeroes from the contract sum and thats my commission.Now,its more difficult..with commissions of 5.5%,I need to invest and do lots of figuring using my canon calculator.

Good thing I diversified into the automobile industry.I was fortunate that I started off with a good Mont Blanc..thus signing off the stacks of documents was hard work but at Rm 30 K per piece,it was a value proposition that was worth the risk of having ink smears on my Armani suits.

Of course,as a business person..you must go into property.Its risky and quite hard work and very hot because the land office air cond units were not so good those days.The trick in the property business is the 3 Ls.Location of the MB,Location of the Pengarah and Location of Japanese Restaurant.I have seen many developers who got it wrong...they focussed on wrong things such as actually visiting the land,getting finance to develop the land and building houses to sell???Thats so ridiculous.I believe in sharing so if I get a piece of land at RM 0.50 per sq feet..well,if my Chinese friends wants it for RM 5 per sq feet...why not?A few thousand acres at Rm 4.50 per ft2 is not a measly figure.

Thus,after the years of hard work..I am posed the question...should NEP be continued?I believe it need not be continued...sorry to say.

I think its more beneficial for the nation if the personal income tax is reduced to zero for those earning more than RM 3 million..I believe there should be no duty on Cuban cigars..and please...no duties on parts for Bentleys and the like..and overseas travel on first class on MAS should be a deductible.

You think we have an easy life but I have so many grouses,issues too...

walla 5 May 2009 at 22:36  

I am starting to lament it as useless to write anymore about us. We keep on coming back to the same impasse. But i hear a cry somewhere. It cuts deep. It is painful. It seems to be permanent. I therefore write this to try and find at least one quantum of solace.

Hopefully we all can get something positive out of all the negatives and anxieties masked as defensive postures and recriminations, arguments and counter-arguments, conundrums within puzzles within enigmas.

This blogger has asked whether there is something deep within our malay psyche which needs to be addressed in order to par with the others in economic performance. That seems to be the primary question.

The policy is just a path attempting to reach a destination. The path might have ended as a perpetual pit-stop only because the route has been diverted by moving the dividers.

So i ask myself the big question. Why?

Is it all about electricity, i enquire in a haze in this heat?

Electricity was quantitatively defined by Herr Ohm who coined Ohm's law which is simple to a fault. His law said that voltage or the potential across a wire is composed of current or the flow of electrons multiplied by resistance from the atoms in the wire against the flow of those electrons.

Can we apply Ohm's Law to the human condition?

The potential of a human being is increased when he exerts more energy into his work which will have to increase as he faces more resistance in his attempt to improve himself. After all the harder one tries to expand, the more problems one will encounter. Problems are everywhere, lying in wait to ambush. Like traffic cops hiding behind billboards.

Someone will quickly remark it would seem strange that resistance or hurdles of life actually contribute to raising the potential of a person for the very reason it reduces the strength of the current that is his actual effort.

But the paradox so said does seem to mirror what we actually experience in life. Every time we try to do something harder something will come up from nowhere to trip up plans and dreams. Life becomes but a procession of hopes dashed by disappointments. But Ohm's law states that the potential increases with those hurdles inasmuch the effort to overcome them. When we imagine the process in that light, this does seem logical. Potential or capability is like muscle stretching. The more you stretch those muscles, the more pain you feel. As resistance, the pain forces your mind to push harder the muscles and stretch them to their limits, thereby increasing your potential, some say threshold of pain. Think smackdown.

So it seems the success or otherwise of a socioeconomic engineering plan boils down to stretching one's muscles.

Since i can't afford those workouts, i cannot prove it. Maybe you can. Do share the findings. Honestly, i prefer to workout with someone. But that would distort threshold readings.

Now, the question to ask is whether the others have been pushing their muscles harder because they had realized that life mimics Ohm's law.

If the answer is an unqualified yes, we will only be saying the obvious. That is a given independent of race. It is a common sentence for all mankind.

So ignoring the obvious question why we had missed that, the next question is how to close gaps.

Buy life insurance and pass on the fund after passing away. Probably that's how many of them have been coming into money for investment. Some have said that even if this is done, the ability to preserve one's funds and grow them into self-cyclical businesses will depend as much on avoiding the basic human weaknesses of dissipation and dissolution as it will be on savvy investing.

If one is covered by a good religion as a way of life, that shouldn't be too difficult.

Otherwise, money made one generation is used in the second but frittered by the third. This was the edict so told.

The next claw-up is education. Who can say he or she hasn't seen those youngsters in school uniforms hiding in alleys taking a puff even after the bell has rung? They have had no guidance or discipline. Their road-map of life has been peer pressure to develop some notion of style as a pass for acceptance. It is acceptance they seek inasmuch thrill of doing something different from the humdrum. They have shattered their lives before they have even started.

It was said that education had started with long hair. Of such length they had been able to tie it up into rope length. Which they then tied to the beam above their heads as they sat deep into the night poring ancient texts to memorize for the upcoming public examinations whose passing promised high positions in the city far away from the grime of poverty into which they were born. The pride of their kampung/village and the hope of all ...invested in some youngster resolute to overcome the fate he was born into so that he can start something that the whole community will be proud of. The use of the head starts with the length of the hair tied into a rope and hung from a beam. To keep one from falling asleep when one should be studying hard.

That's why up till today they value education so much. Because they had seen something in it beyond the ken of fate, some say fatalism.

I could have mentioned his name was Rashid. He took HSC Arts when it still had some standard. Much to study. Difficult to pass. His father, a religion teacher, would lock him in the room. Imagine someone that age being locked in the room. Study! came the bellow. End result? He stretched his mental sinews and came up, i repeat, up, with 3A's. Although the father's method was ascetic, the family was ecstatic. His father wanted him to be a lawyer view magistrate. He wanted to be an accountant. Hopefully he made it. Perhaps a successful investment banker.

In life it's good to know a banker, a magistrate and the nearest bicycle shop repairer.

So these are the basic qualities. Are they any different from those that had made the others? I don't think so. Neither the market. Nor those amongst us here who have 'arrived' (as those leather filofax organizers are so branded).

We spend so much sending people overseas and then pumping in billions on projects but the inner core of human motivation and fire of self-improvement is neglected. Without the basic, how can one progress to intermediate and then advanced?

I would like to take a moment to try and think how the others would view the malays in general. But that would make this post too long and it may all be wrong anyway.

Anyway i have said my prayers and would like to sit awhile as i have been everyday for so many years...staring into the void of the alley.

It's wrestling out the only dignity left....not to have wasted an entire life.

So i know the pain too.

Salam's.

Anonymous,  6 May 2009 at 06:32  

May I point out to the not so intelligent others out there who, like me (groggy in the morning, I had to read twice to be sure the Anon 21:34 was a joke) may otherwise believe what that Anon is saying. He is joking.

May I also say it in a plain and direct way:

I agree with the comment regarding waste of money on expensive weddings. We need to promote a new saying: biar mati adat jangan mati anak. (Was it TDM who said we should discard the mind-numbing old proverbs? I think we must).

From Johor to Perlis by the old roads, we still find kampong Malays relaxing at the covered bus stops or kedai kopi, but not so many as 20-30 years ago. In the towns, there have been many Malays away for or at work from dawn to dusk. The number of Malays in business has also increased greatly: some say the last UMNO Gen Assembly was made up of around 60% contractors. Let's be fair to our own kind a little. Compared to what we were before Merdeka, we have progressed considerably.

No doubt, it's far from enough. Many say so slow. But China with 4,500 years of history and over 1,000 years of inventions, many of which were from ancient times, was even a pariah state until a decade or so ago. The same for India, which has about the same length of history; with 1 billion Indians in that country, they almost allowed an Italian born woman to rule them recently. Even the Americans don't allow foreign born to rule them. So, those who grumble that the Malays still have not achieved 30% corporate wealth despite NEP MUST BEAR THOSE FACTS IN MIND ALWAYS.

But those must not be an excuse for the Malays. That we don't have a tradition, a business culture, a way of life based on business, must also not be an excuse. We must try harder.

Our problem is corruption and corrupt minds. Everybody knows UMNO is corrupt to the core. UMNO leads the Government. Corruption,
cronyism, nepotism ruled in the past. NEP benefits were not properly distributed. They created an elite class that included 1-2 billionaires and widened the Malay middle class a little, but many Malays have not benefitted from the NEP. Corruption is not being sufficiently addressed. The political will to do so has not emerged. Unless the new Government changes the way things have been going, the problems will remain for a long time. May even be further compounded. Remember, the "cultural make up" that is referred to in this blog article encompasses the entire spectrum of Malay thinking, attitude, mentality and way of life - corruption, cronyism, nepotism and all.

Anonymous,  6 May 2009 at 10:04  

Are You Gonna Go My Way said...

U forget to say that iff there is NO BTN u would not be writing as u r! There might then be a chance for Bangsa Malaysia.

There is more to Malaysian history than what the craps that BTN has drowned into yr cube-blocked grey cells. Why cube-blocked? Because it’s like a cube-block, a kick will move it a face square. A harder kick will at most move a few square face length.

That’s the problem with umno inspired, BTN re-inforced education. One sided, horned-tip corner outlook. Exactly the kind of cattle that Dato ‘elegantly’ described in this article!

I support its too much to ask for a bola. All rounders r confined to the lower end of the Malay M’sians, occupying the lower end of their Gini Coef. They r all-rounder by force of circumstances. They r consistently there for a reason – so that hp6 people like u can help to use them as excuses to perpetuate the legacy of the few umno war-lords at the top of the chain.

Point by point;

1)R u sure ‘If there is only one race in Malaysia, we won’t see the existence of this debate’?

Just answer this, why the umno war-lords fight so hard to get a piece of ‘meat’? After all, ‘whoever makes money does not matter at all because we are all one and the same’!

2)U really think ‘our forefathers sell their soul and soil to the Portuguese, Dutch and English and other foreigners’?

Give more credits to those elders. Without their sacrifices, u wont be talking craps here.

3)‘allow the Chinese and Indian immigrant to become Malaysian citizens’ is not yr call! it’s the cause of natural human movements. The Portuguese, Dutch and English knew it & they also needed 'workers' to work the 'lands' for returns.

Furthermore, their citizenship contributed more than what BTN told dugong like u, to the nationhood of M’sia.

4)Typical BTN propaganda! As if there r not successful Malay M’sians in their dealings with the ‘pendatang’. Or r all those successful Malay M’sians, cronies of pendatang?

5)Now ‘..the law that did not allow the Malays to become traders in rubber but only can become tappers. Only the Chinese were allowed to become buyers and sellers of rubber.’

Show this piece of official British document to substantiate yr claims. I can throw tons of official British documents to prove that the ‘gentlemanly’ locals r too ‘slow’ to learn to be a trader. The nitty-gritty of trading schemes simply just overwhelmed their simple easy going life.

Moreover, the Malay Malayans, due to the fear of proselytisation, sent most of their children to madrasahs rather than proper English Schools. This resulted in majority of the Malay Malayans facing the same job opportunity like NOW – monolingual with limited modern/current technical know-hows. There were exceptions, loyalties & far-sighted Malay Malayans. Their decedents generally r doing well without the ‘tongkats’.

6)R u going to argue the bygone right of colonial powers? Cry yr heart out, man! The Orang Asli should show u the finger for saying this.

7)Refer to point 6 & exercise that piece of cube cells a little bit more for further enlightenment.

8)Everything must be provided on a platter! What happen to entrepreneurship? What happen to educated ingenuity? Thanks yr lucky star that u r been sent oversea on ‘questionable’ merits, spent double, treble time to get the degree & yet still expect to be given fund to start a business. What logic & business sense?

9)There r rich Malays doing that silently now. But their number is small & can only reach so far. However, there is a mother lode waiting to be explored – the black money stacked away oversea by those umno war-lords! Do spend time to think about how to tackle this rather than keep sobbing about the BTN craps.

10)‘..with NEP, they still make more money than the Malays.’

Honestly, under NEP? What economic sense is that? Simpleton argument that don’t even worth the reply!

11)‘…the Chinese ADA HATI BUDI SIKIT DAN TAK KISAH SANGAT SEBAB ORANG2 CHINA TAK MAKIN MISKIN PUN…TAKAN ITU PUN NAK BERKIRA’

The DLL M'sians have been very UNDERSTANDING & PATIENCE for agreeing to NEP for a limited period to uplift the poor Malay M’sians. This is done despite the fact that there r POOR DLL M'sians, living on par with the poor Malay M’sians. 15yrs, fine. 30 yrs, OK-lah, just give a little bit due to their ‘special positions’. 50yrs? U might as well ask for perpetual, so that yr weakling trace can be forever enhanced.

IS THAT WHAT U WANT?

Anonymous,  6 May 2009 at 11:14  

Walla,

Like u I've been staring into miles of tunnel since I left.

The damn stats matrix still dont match. & the machine is still sulking without any fire.

Well summer is coming, the place will be deserted. Perhaps its time to do something different to the mind, so that alter inspiration can help to resolve the god's tiny dot.

Do exercise that mind. Judging from the write-ups its still full of youthful flame.

Dont willow away.

rgds,

gwlnet

Anonymous,  6 May 2009 at 13:33  

Watch out Anon 10:04. We might ask
just that. NEP in perpetuity.

After all, you and your descendents get ctitizenship in perpetuity, don't you? Your citizenship was in exchange for our special position. It's called the Social Contract. Your forefathers agreed with our forefathers. You have to accept that. Just as we accept the citizenship rights of your descendents forever.

Our special position is written in the Constitution and is for perpetuity. Why can't we have NEP, or whatever it may be called later, as part of our special position in perpetuity? Why can't we ask for more than 30% corporate wealth? And other forms of wealth?We are 60% of the population here.
We'll defend the Constitution whatever the cost.

You start calling us a weakling race (?trace), trying to imply you are the stronger race or culture that I have seen your kind speak about. It's not good talking like that. I can write yards to show your culture is not as great as you might think. But I don't want to do that. In fact, I don't want to deal with people like you. Or read any of your replies. Maybe my friend Are You Going My Way would want to deal with you. That's up to him.

I don't bother if you write like that in your blog. Or in blogs where people like you go to. But this is a respectable blog and I like to read this blog. I must disabuse your attempt at abusing us. Talking about us as a weakling race. Utterly irresponsible. Very small mind indeed. Subversive kind. You see, up to now, I haven't said anything bad about your race. Only about you.

walla 6 May 2009 at 14:40  

Thanks, gwlnet.

I sincerely wish you the best of life wherever you will be.

Are You Gonna Go My Way,  6 May 2009 at 15:16  

Anon at 06 May 2009 10:04


I don’t usually entertain that kind of provocation from some anonymous Ah Pek…..not worth it. But just to show that im alive….and kicking I will …

The malays are not the weakling here….let me borrow a quote from brother Deminegara
“ talking about tongkat? This Tanah Melayu is actually a tongkat to you people for many years already… you come to this tongkat because you no longer have any tongkats back in China….and this tongkat is in perpetuity

For your information , I would not stoop as low as you to…generalize all Chinese are bad people.. in my line of business I pay them salaries…and most of my clients are Chinese. My new venture coming soon is with a Chinese company…and I’ve seen some lazy Chinese and I have seen some hardworking Chinese. I never choose according to races with whom I want to do business with.

Can you Chinese people out there do the same? Meritocracy? Or what ever you been yelling..as if you are an example of people who practice total meritocracy.

“allow the Chinese and Indian immigrant to become Malaysian citizens’ is not yr call! it’s the cause of natural human movements”

You want to know what come natural after that?

A war will erupt…the people of the land will chase away all pendatangs…killing here and there….etc…

You didn’t see that happen here in Malaysia ….because we are people of god and gentlemen to a fault.


The Malay peasants were kept in misery. The agricultural rights of the indigenous Malays, the Bumiputra (Sons of the Soil), were protected by law to soothe them against colonial domination. In reality, Malay peasants were encouraged to grow rice for local consumption, as they had done for ages, but were prevented from planting rubber, a more lucrative crop reserved for plantations and commercial farmers (often Chinese). British colonial administration not only discouraged Malay rubber production but introduced in 1913 a land reservation policy that blocked Malay land sales to non-Malays, thus driving down land values by as much as 50 percent. Khoo Boo Teik notes: "As a consequence of this ethnic division of labour, the Malay peasantry escaped the harsh conditions of early colonial capitalism that took a heavy tool on migrant labour. But the rural Malay community was thereby locked into an immiserating close-to-subsistence sector." (in The Political Economy of South-East Asia, edited by Rodan, Hewison and Robison, p.181)”

Go back and study your history……..

Anonymous,  6 May 2009 at 15:56  

Anon 13:33,

Getting fire up ye?

U r not my audience! So yr shouting of ignoring me cost me nothing, except rising yr own blood pressure & showing yr simple mind. Perhaps u can very convincingly ask Dato to censor me off from his blog. But, I guess Dato has more sense than u. & my writings have not been expressed in expletives and foul language, too.

But perhaps u have better & more creative imagination concerning my writings? Then ignored me, OK?

U want NEP in perpetuity? Fine by me! Because u only convince me about yr weakling trace. Then u r only one person! Do all the Saks, Wengers, Haris etc etc want to share this trace of yrs? U put yrself, really one-up, man!

Do tell me, pls, where have I talked bad about yr race? Or is it yr kind that I’ve worked with big strokes?

First – Social Contract! What social contract? Do tell me where is this social contract mentioned in the Constitution.

Second - my citizenship was in exchange for yr special position. Is it mentioned in the Constitution?

Third – what happen to the findings of Reid commission? What happen to T Dr Ismail’s proclamation of limiting the period of NEP to save the maruah of the race.

Ouch, BTN, forgot to mention that!

Can’t blame this kind of thinking, growing out of these BTN dugong!

Let me tell u a very simple story so that people like u can by chance understand. The story has to start somewhere in time so that it’s not long winding & repetitive, as history always like to repeat herself.

U owned a piece of land from whatever reason. Here first, claimed by force from the Orang Asli, whatever. The claim of ownership doesn’t matter as it’s lost in time.

U left waste to most of the land by hardly cultivate its true potential. Easily go lucky or blur sotong, nobody cares anyway.

Then one day some outsider came & stay. Again his reason of coming is lost in history. He bought the land from u & worked his gut out to transform the land by trying whatever means to explore its full potential.

In time, the land progressed from a back water to something the neighboring countries envied. There r no natural calamities & the land is full of natural resources & plants. A paradise!

But nature always plays fair. No natural calamities. Full of god given resources. Nothing in this world is given on a platter. This paradise had a disease, man made. Its called human peril of envy!

Thus the paradise was no more. The 1st inhabitants want an almost free claimed of 30% goodies just because now they have 60% of the number. All sort of reasons were dug out, concocted, just to get that 30%.

True efforts to compete for that 30% or whatever, r lost in this projected inward-looking, inferiority complex. Worst, less than 1% of that 30% were manipulating that other 29+% to achieve a good life. For the past 30+yr these 29+% lied ignorant, except keep blaming the pendatang for their ill-lives, due mostly to that malignant cancer known as BTN.

Now, that there r traces of that 29+% r awakening to the true facts. But the damage to the land was severe. The inhabitants of various races cannot live in harmony due to that 1+% bigots.

Just like someone in another commence mentioned ‘Any cure ? In my opinion not for a long long time. When the ills have been ingrained for so many decades and when an entire community is involved... no one can change it.’ And by keep hiding behind that ‘… "cultural make up" that … encompasses the entire spectrum of Malay thinking, attitude, mentality and way of life - corruption, cronyism, nepotism and all.’ u r doing a disservices to yr NBA.

End of a scary story!

Now tell me whose ‘Utterly irresponsible. Very small mind indeed. Subversive kind. (this is a new one!),

You see, up to now, I haven't ALSO said anything bad about your race. Only about you.

Anonymous,  6 May 2009 at 16:56  

Are You Gonna Go My Way said...

Thousand apologies, didn’t know that u r a choir boy. If I know earlier then Ah Pek will write differently.

Quess u r the same as anon13:33! What the hell happened to u guy’s England reading? Take about standard of English……..

Anywhere in my write-up @ 10:04 (must be careful while dealing with the choir boys as they r not as ... as the lead singer) THAT I purposely mentioned Malay M’sian/Malayan is weakling? Hello there, re-tri-&-quatri-read my 10:03 comments A-OK?

What I’ve mentioned is YR weakling trace. Understand YOUR? Maksud nya, awak, or U. Faham ni? It’s a singular here, a-OK?

BTW I didnt provoke. I’m just follow anon20:33’s advice to correct ‘this kind of irresponsible statements ..they'll continue to surface. And they must be challenged, their mischievous arguments debunked, otherwise the lies and half truths may appear factual. They may even cause ill feelings among the various communities in the country.’

So u better be kicking & alive to defense yr words, Otherwise eat it’ like the good doctor said.

Anyway I wont get involved with the blasphemy concerning the ‘tongkat’ in China. Yr religion say fitnah is a sin & I’m no sin player. BTW, I thought ‘tongkat ali’ is only available in Nusantara. There is an equivalent in China, know as ginseng. & the Cina Peks there have been taking it for thousands of years. The last I checked, ginseng is still in production in Northern China & its perpetuity is not in question. The Korean is into this herb heavily too, so ginseng might out-grow ‘tongkat ali’, given the attitude & number of followers.

BTW, The Political Economy of South-East Asia, edited by Rodan, Hewison and Robison is not a British colonial official document! It is NOT A Official documents. It’s a reference book subject to peer-reviewed. A-OK?

Now here is a British colonial official document for yr bed-time perusal, it will definitely help to solve insomnia - British Documents on the End of Empire Project (BDEEP). I’m too lazy to show u the pages of quotes. Do look them up for yr ‘englitenment’, OK?

Omong 6 May 2009 at 18:11  

to Anon 06 May 2009 15:56

Democracy means the majority decides, end of story!

there should be a citizenship TEST with strict criteria of knowledge in national language, history, constitution etc

anyone who fails will be deported to whichever country is willing to accept the rejects

Anonymous,  6 May 2009 at 18:52  

errata,

Pls replace the numerical as shown in the following paragraph in my comments @15:56

“True efforts to compete for that 30% or whatever, r lost in this projected inward-looking, inferiority complex. Worst, less than 1% of that 60% were manipulating that other 59+% to achieve a good life. For the past 30+yr these 59+% lied ignorant, except keep blaming the pendatang for their ill-lives, due mostly to that malignant cancer known as BTN.

Now, that there r traces of that 59+% r awakening to the true facts. But the damage to the land was severe. The inhabitants of various races cannot live in harmony due to that 1+% bigots.”

My sincere apology

Anonymous,  6 May 2009 at 20:10  

Omong said...

Hahahaha.........tak bolih tahan ni, tu?

One down, more to come....

Yr defination of democracy is ?(dont know what to state) time.

The founder Greek didnt mean it this way. Do look up The Republic By Plato in yr spare time after the busy MSM browsing. OK?

Oh! save u more time if u care to read The Wolf and the Silence of the Lamb by Articulations...A totally enjoyable gem coming out from this side of M'sia.

Who say M'sia has NO thinker, especially Malay M'sian thinker.

There r maybe still hope.......

'..there should be a citizenship TEST with strict criteria of knowledge in national language, history, constitution etc'

Mmmm.., national language? oh u mean Bahasa Malaysia. No problem! Most of the younger DLL M'sians can speak that. Some even out-shine the Malay M'sian hand-down. Even old bone like me has little problem with my colloqual Melayu, just ask my kampong mates here in.....

History? This is juicy! BTW no BTN version, a-OK? Then whose version? The victor's or the at-large's? Its going to be VERY difficult for this one. One failed move, Omong might ended up in Timbuktu! Ouch, double ouch!

Constitution! This is a piece of cake. All we need is a panel of independent top judges from Commonwealth then we r on.

Game? Or u r asking too much to chew now?

Omong 6 May 2009 at 23:29  

To Rambler 06 May 2009 20:10

Just what is your point here? Please present a coherent argument.

In your attempt to appear learned, you throw in a few titles here and there without articulating your pertinent points.

A lot of over-inflated claims of superiority and abilities?

With spelling mistakes in abundance, definitely unconvincing.

What is clear though, is this pseudo air of superiority and a lot of FRUSTRATION.

If your grasp of Bahasa Malaysia is as good as your English, we know how you will fare in the citizenship test.

Would like to see you in baju kurong and songkok, complete with the keris.

He he - barulah anak jati Malaysia …

Anonymous,  7 May 2009 at 01:54  

Omong,

Final call!

Someone said something like this;

If u banged the door with yr head once & it opened, entered.

Twice & with a bloody forehead, only then it opened, entered juga.

The third time u should banged the wall instead for dealing with a door that couldnt opened.

Go figure for the moral of the story, a-OK?

BTW if I'm really feeling superior I wouldnt even want to banged this door in the first place.

Now I do feel frustrated for trying my very best to open a BTN-stucked door.

So I go sleepy, a-OK? U go on shouting, fine with me.

I'm a true anak jati M'sia, without that superficial dress code.

Anonymous,  7 May 2009 at 08:19  

To Psycho 07 May 2009 01:54

So now we are into story telling to get our points across.

Moral of the story: open the door patiently with the GOLDEN key.

Why bang your head and get injured?

And then become sleepy??

Sheeesh ...

That "superficial" dress code is a TRUE symbol of a proud and honourable race, albeit TOO gracious for the likes of you.

Go figure (skating?)

P.S. I do not shout but I am TRULY puzzled. You're the one shouting, poor thing.

Omong

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